Feast of the Assumption of Mary

On Aug. 15 is the solemnity of the Assumption of Mary.


What is the Assumption of Mary, how did it come to be defined, and what relevance does it have for our lives?


Since it is a dogma defined by the pope (rather than by an ecumenical council, for example), it is also an “ex cathedra” statement (one delivered “from the chair” of Peter).


Because it is infallibly defined, it calls for the definitive assent of the faithful.


Pope John Paul II explained:


The definition of the dogma, in conformity with the universal faith of the People of God, definitively excludes every doubt and calls for the express assent of all Christians [General Audience, July 2, 1997].


Note that all infallibly defined teachings are things we are obliged to believe, even if they aren’t defined “ex cathedra” (by the pope acting on his own).


This teaching was infallibly defined by Pope Pius XII on Nov. 1, 1950 in the bull Munificentissimus Deus (Latin, “Most Bountiful God”).


As Pius XII explained, this is “a divinely revealed dogma” (ibid.).


This means that it is a dogma in the proper sense. It is thus a matter of faith that has been divinely revealed by God and that has been infallibly proposed by the Magisterium of the Church as such.


Being free of Original Sin and its stain is not the same thing as being in a glorified, deathless condition.


Jesus was also free of Original Sin and its stain, but he could—and did—die.


Expressing a common view among theologians, Ludwig Ott writes:


For Mary, death, in consequence of her freedom from original sin and from personal sin, was not a consequence of punishment of sin.